About Shanghai

Key Dates

Full SubmissionApril 5, 2018
Abstract SubmissionMarch 25, 2018
Author Notificationwithin 2 weeks
Final VersionApril 17, 2018
RegistrationApril 17, 2018
Main ConferenceApril 27-29, 2018







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About Shanghai

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As the largest city in China and an economic, commercial and financial center, Shanghai is vital to the country's future. No other city in the country is more vibrant and fascinating or has such a unique colonial past.

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Welcome to Shanghai

As the largest city in China and an economic, commercial and financial center, Shanghai is vital to the country's future. No other city in the country is more vibrant and fascinating or has such a unique colonial past.


Shanghai, literally 'Above the Sea', is a port city on the Huangpu River, where the Yangtze River empties into the East China Sea. Originally a fishing and textiles town, the city gained its identity after it was opened to foreign powers by the 1842 Treaty of Nanking. The British, French, Americans, Germans, and Russians moved in, setting up their distinct Western-style banks, trading houses, and mansions, leaving a permanent architectural legacy. The city flourished as a cosmopolitan and thriving commercial and financial center, dubbed the "Pairs of the East" in 1920s and 1930s. In spite of being the cradle of Chinese Communism, the city was neglected during the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. In 1990, it was chosen to spearhead modern China's reform and opening up, which resulted in intense development. In addition, the city has often been the inspiration for novels, films and cocktails. It is probably the most evocative city for an outsider to visit all of the country. Beijing may be more mysterious, but Shanghai offers half-understood, semi-mythical images.


Easily China's richest city and the leading trendsetter in fashion, design and the arts, Shanghai is the best city in the country for dining and shopping. Locals of the city, considered frank, efficient, and progressive, are creating the country's most outward-looking, and modern metropolis, replete with legions of futuristic skyscrapers, glitzy restaurants, bars, hotels, brand awareness and shopping savvy, competing with rival Asia cities such as Hong Kong, and Singapore.


Sockets & plugs

Adapter  required, transformer not needed

China uses 220V, 50Hz with sockets and plugs Type A, Type C and Type I.


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       Type A              Type C             Type I